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gebana

08/17/2020

A closer look at ships

How environmentally damaging are container ships? It’s not a simple question. With the help of professionals in Schaffhausen, we’ve found a clear answer: they cause less damage than the cultivation of food that is transported by ship.

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08/06/2020

"gebana money nana"

How does a Swiss company share its turnover with 2,500 family farmers in Burkina Faso? It takes a plan, modern technology, a fair share of patience and lots of enthusiasm. Text & Photos: Eleonora Gallo, gebana Berlin

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07/01/2020 Production Ecology

Good Avocado, Bad Avocado

The avocado has gone through many phases, from world-saving fruit to mass-produced food to a terrible evil that should never be bought again. But is it really so? Let’s take a look at the facts.

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06/17/2020 Insights Company

Life of uncertainty

Two million people depend on humanitarian aid; over half a million are refugees. Attacks and assaults, people injured and dead, a third of the country is not under state control. Life in Burkina Faso has become more dangerous. Yet we’re staying put.

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12/12/2019 Insights Fair Trade

Pleasant developments in Togo

For gebana Togo a successful year is slowly coming to an end. During this year, gebana Togo worked with more female farmers than ever before and acquired some new exciting customers. A new EU regulation might have had something to do with the latter.

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10/07/2019 Insights

Making agriculture digital

At the beginning of 2019 we tried something new in Togo: With an app, we wanted to improve and above all simplify the flow of information between family farmers and gebana. Michael Stamm, member of our development team, talks about the experiment and how we will continue.

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09/18/2019 Company Fair Trade

Why change the rules?

When trade flourishes, countries can develop and economies can grow. This leads to a variety of offerings that are adapted to consumer needs. Production, supply chain, distribution – the entire system becomes more efficient, thus increasing prosperity. So why change the rules of trade? Because wealth is unevenly distributed and we as consumers cannot see the whole picture.

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